Connect with us

Sports

Boo Williams: From the NFL to a Life of Giving Back

Cannabis helped Boo Williams get back on track after suffering head trauma.

Published

on

Boo Williams: From the NFL to a Life of Giving Back
Courtesy of Boo Williams

After former U.S. National Football League (NFL) player Eddie “Boo” Williams’ athletic career ended via blunt head trauma and subsequent damage to his frontal cortex, he thought his life was over. Laying down on railroad tracks, waiting to die, he was rescued by homeless men who took him to a friend’s home.

Chronic concussions in football, specifically with damage to the frontal cortex, limits complex thinking and impulse control, causing a short fuse, with former football players becoming erratic, angry, and worse. Dealing with the pain alone, with its subsequent laundry list of pharmaceuticals, is a whole other matter, typically leading to addiction and an early death. 

Though Williams said he never became abusive, he knew he had some serious issues to work through.

“I was watching the Khloe & Lamar docuseries, and they were interviewing a friend of Odin’s who was depressed, then got help at a place in California called, the Crosby Clinic,” Williams shared. “I knew I had to get there, and called them. In one week, I was there.”

A video clip on YouTube produced at The Crosby Clinic in Southern California, features Williams getting healthy, looking good, and advocating for the center; stating, he found a sense of well-being after overcoming injuries, emotional distress, and subsequent drug abuse.

The Crosby Center focuses on individualized programs for drug and alcohol recovery; with Williams proudly proclaiming he added another dimension to the programs offered, including using cannabis to overcome emotional obstacles.

“Crosby isn’t about alternative medicine, but if your doctor approves it, you can use cannabis,” he explained. “We had a session around a fire pit at Crosby one night. We introduced the plant to the players there with an open discussion. Everyone was able to open up about their true feelings – they were able to say what was really bothering them – some of them for the first time. It was helpful in going into the group sessions – now they were able to share, when they weren’t before.”

Williams believes cannabis helps open up your third eye, allowing you to see past the emotional chains that often binds someone to a hurtful or abusive past. 

According to a piece in Waking Times, Canadian author, Chris Bennet, who has penned books on the spiritual and Biblical history of cannabis, states that our Pineal Gland, or the “’Seat of the Soul,’ as described by Rene Descartes; “… is the focal point of our spiritual guiding system which makes us go beyond the five senses of rationality and become multisensory; tuned into and aware of higher dimensions of consciousness within a holographic cosmos.” Bennet continues, “Cannabis or Marijuana among other psychedelics, facilitates the activation of the pineal gland and helps turn on the third eye or the mind’s eye, directing our spiritual evolution to wholeness.”

This theory was not lost on Williams, who, prior to recover, felt lost emotionally and broken physically, after his football career ended. 

As quoted in Vice, via David Davis, “I was in a dark place,” he said. “I thought I was a small person in a big person’s body. I felt like I had no purpose.”

“Before cannabis, I only had a green light on all the emotions I was feeling – there was no yellow light to red, and no stopping if things got heated,” he shared during a phone conversation. “Cannabis gave me a yellow light, to stop and think about how I’m feeling, and gives me a red light, keeping my emotions in check.”

Once he began ingesting cannabis via medibles and tinctures, both his pain levels and emotional well-being notably improved.

“CBD is like taking an aspirin, you don’t feel it working, but the pain is gone,” he shared. “Add THC and it replaces SSRIs – helping your emotions, anxiety – everything is in check in a more natural way, with no bad side effects.”

Williams was inspired to start his own line of cannabis products via BooBeary Products. His current line is comprised of tinctures, liquid capsules, and topical creams, available online via his website and in several locations throughout Louisiana and Florida.

Testimonials include help with muscle pain via the lotions and body pain via the capsules.

“It took me every ounce of energy to move my legs, then enter Boo Williams, stage left, and I started taking BooBeary capsules,” Michelle Vogel said via a Facebook posting. “My quality of life has improved, I can walk much better and even my mental state is getting better. I thank God for putting Boo and his products into my life. A BooBeary a day keeps thee dumb-ass specialists away!”

Leann Bird-Robbins writes in another post, “My girlfriend’s mom used your cream on her hands that are filled with arthritis, and the pain was gone within hours! She was in disbelief – has tried everything and nothing worked like the BooBeary cream.”

Since being helped himself, Williams said he’s walking the talk, reaching out to people in need, giving them some love and hope – and not just with CBD products. His home state of Florida continues to be ravaged from hurricanes, and he’s been there in real time to lend a hand with his Floridian not-for-profit Corporation, BooBeary Kares, Inc.; also a Federal 501c3 non-profit.

This year BooBeary Products joined forces with Summit Harbor Holding, Inc., and Limitless Venture Group, Inc., bringing BooBeary into the publically traded market. At this time they are seeking investors for several projects, including help in building a multi-unit retreat center out of hemp, as temporary housing for those displaced by hurricanes along the Florida and Gulf Coast. 

The property slatted for Logan’s Retreat in Youngstown, Florida, is owned by Shelly Summers, is already set-up to host multiple families. Logan was Summers’ son, who was killed in a car accident. Williams and Summers are eager to build hemp structures in her son’s memory. 

After recovery, using cannabis as one of the tools in his kit, he said he was led to a life of service – to the community at large, for the greater good. 

“When celebrities go to Vegas, they don’t visit shelters, but I do,” he shared. “I live near the same neighborhood I grew up in, and people here need help from hurricanes. My crew will go in, set up a barbecue, and hand out clothes, personal care products – whatever they need. Then, I can talk about cannabis and how it changed my life.”

This form of educating via volunteerism is working for Williams and the people he’s reaching.

“Cannabis helped me get off the drugs – including the legal prescription meds,” he surmised. “Cannabis helped me find my gifts; showed me who I am; and what I was put on this planet to do. Football was a big part of my life, but it’s not my entire life now. I believe was put here to help and inspire others. And cannabis helps me do that every single day.”

Trending