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Group Hopes Car Crash Rolling Papers Will Prevent Stoned Driving

In spite of the longstanding controversy surrounding the issue of stoned driving, the latest federal research suggests that smoking weed before getting behind the wheel does not actually contribute to an increase in motor vehicle accidents. Yet, this statistic has not stopped a group of advocates from unleashing a unique campaign that attempts to get high minds to reconsider hitting the road with a buzz.

An organization calling themselves “We Save Lives” has created rolling papers that simulate a car crash when used to twist up a joint. It is a cautionary novelty, of sorts, branded with the message: “Pot slows your reactions, don’t smoke and drive.” The organization hopes to encourage stoners to think twice about the fatal repercussions of driving high.

This campaign is being overseen by Mothers Against Drunk Driving founder Candace Lightner, who was considered somewhat of a hypocrite back in 1994, after she traded her role at MADD for a position lobbying for the alcohol industry. She recently told The Daily Caller that she believes her work with the Beverage Institute contributed to more responsible practices in regards to how booze was marketed across the nation, a goal she hopes to achieve for the marijuana industry.

Although there are pot proponents who support measures aimed at preventing driving under the influence of weed, Lightner believes there are countless people living in legal states who are completely oblivious to the dangers of stoned driving.

“People are not only unaware, they are in denial,” Lightner said. “Any time we put something on our website or social media about the dangers of driving under the influence of marijuana, almost all of the comments are in defense of the drug. No one does that when you talk about alcohol and driving.”

Perhaps this resistance from the cannabis community stems from a study published earlier this year by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration that suggests there is not enough data pertaining to the subject of stoned driving to consider it a detriment to the roadways of America.

“It is difficult to establish a relationship between a person’s THC blood or plasma concentration and performance impairing effects,” the agency’s website states.

In a recent press release, “We Save Lives” claimed their Weed Advisor car crash rolling papers were a huge success during World Cannabis Week in Denver. What they fail to consider, however, is that while weed connoisseurs were likely entertained by such a humorous approach to prevention, no one in attendance at the Denver Cannabis Cup actually bought into the idea of this cartoon collision having the power to prevent red-eyed runs for late night sustenance.

But, hey, thanks for the papers… We were running low.

 

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